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Our Work

Also, mark your calendars for March 8, 2021! We are hosting a virtual event on #InternationalWomensDay entitled, “Towards a Fistula-Free Future: 15 Years of Breakthroughs and Program Impact.” Register today: http://bit.ly/FCPlus-Webinar

Thanks everyone! The FC+ website is a great place to start for more information and resources on fistula prevention and treatment, including research results, project reports, and stories from providers and clients. http://bit.ly/fistularesources https://twitter.com/EngenderHealth/status/1364608432880443393

Obstetric fistula is a beacon of inequality, as it occurs where women are already living with limited resources and access to healthcare. Additionally, once fistula occurs, women often face significant stigma and isolation which can impact their social and economic wellbeing. https://twitter.com/EngenderHealth/status/1364605591528886273

We also must strengthen the healthcare workforce, particularly by supporting high-quality surgical training to ensure women receive quality c-sections when needed–a focus of the new @USAID_MOMENTUM Safe Surgery in Family Planning & Obstetrics project led by @EngenderHealth.

Great question! To truly #EndFistula, we must prevent new cases while treating existing ones. Some keys to fistula prevention are girls’ education, addressing poverty, delaying marriage age, access to sexual & repro healthcare, and timely & high-quality emergency obstetric care. https://twitter.com/EngenderHealth/status/1364605397756182530

Yes. Depending on severity, there are surgical & non-surgical treatment options. The Fistula Care Plus (FC+) project works to strengthen the entire continuum of care–from prevention to fistula diagnosis, safe surgical repair, rehabilitation, & reintegration back to her community. https://twitter.com/EngenderHealth/status/1364605303858282499

Obstetric fistula is a maternal injury that can occur from prolonged/obstructed labor where a woman is left with a hole in the birth canal that leaks urine and/or feces. An estimated 2 million women live with this devastating condition–almost all in low & middle-income countries. https://twitter.com/EngenderHealth/status/1364598320333791237

Starting now! Tune in to for an interactive session on obstetric fistula with the @USAID @fistulacare Plus project.

"Everyone, equally, has a human right to health. However, our health systems, communities, and nations do not support people's health equally or equitably."

Read the full text from @EngenderHealth & @POuagaPF on diversity and solidarity in global health: https://bit.ly/3uvFsCO

Prioritize inclusion of people who suffer the most from inequities in health and health-care for designing solutions to address their needs. Commentary with @EngenderHealth team who talk about #power & #DiversityandInclusion in global health @TraciLBaird https://www.thelancet.com/journals/langlo/article/PIIS2214-109X(21)00029-2/fulltext#%20

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Overview

Download the SEED™ Assessment Guide for Family Planning

EngenderHealth has developed the SEED™ Assessment Guide for Family Planning Programming , a comprehensive, easy-to-use tool to help program managers and staff determine strengths and weaknesses in family planning programs by identifying programmatic gaps that require further investment or more in-depth assessment.

The Supply–Enabling Environment–Demand (SEED) Programming Model™ is a holistic programming framework based on the principle that sexual and reproductive health (SRH) programs will be more successful and sustainable if they comprehensively address the multifaceted determinants of health, and if they include synergistic interventions that:

The SEED Model

In particular, the SEED Programming Model™ emerged from an earlier iteration—the Supply-Demand-Advocacy (SDA) Model, which was developed by EngenderHealth under the ACQUIRE Project.

The SEED Programming Model™ builds on much of the thinking that has emerged from decades of FP/SRH program experience –both that of EngenderHealth and other technical organizations – in its grounding precept that a combination of interventions in the three interdependent and mutually supportive areas of supply, enabling environment, and demand will better enable programs to improve SRH in the communities they serve.

The SEED Programming Model™ can contribute to a wide range of program planning functions. Using it can help SRH program planners:

  • Foster a broad-based approach to program assessment, design, implementation, and evaluation;
  • Highlight the need to effectively and synergistically address factors related to service delivery and support systems, culture, and community, as well as policy, governance, and accountability;
  • Develop a framework for partnering, given that no single entity is likely to have the capacity, mandate, or expertise to address all components of Supply, Enabling Environment, and Demand; and
  • Undertake a range of interventions at various levels—from the national down to the district, facility, and community levels.
Programs dedicated to improving SRH often look to attain specific health outcomes, such as helping clients to achieve safe pregnancy and delivery outcomes, assisting them to meet their reproductive intentions through family planning (FP), or seeking the improved health of people living with HIV/AIDS. For this reason, EngenderHealth has developed multiple versions of the SEED Programming Model to address each of these specific areas within SRH.

Though not incorporated visually into the SEED Model, EngenderHealth subscribes to four underlying principles of good program design and implementation – The Fundamentals of Care, Evidence-Based Programming, Gender Equity, and Stakeholder Engagement.

Ultimately, the SEED Programming Model™ can help those involved in designing and implementing SRH programs (be they technical organizations, ministries of health, donors, or others involved in SRH programming activities) to take a comprehensive approach to their work, thus increasing the likelihood of programmatic success and sustainability, and as a result, improving the health of individuals, families, and communities.

 

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