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Our Work

EngenderHealth Uganda featured in @WhatWomenWantHC blogpost series https://t.co/KNKn0TgElU @MsMagazine

Wise words from our #WCW , the fabulous @jk_rowling! Take power into your own hands & advocate for #ReproHealth: https://t.co/vPrn5at4Hd #WheresTheFP

Rashida survived her last pregnancy thanks to counseling from an EngenderHealth-trained health worker! https://t.co/5T7UtXgTHU

The @whatwomenwanthc campaign is calling on young women and girls around the world to share what’s important to them when it comes to maternal and #reproductivehealth. Take the survey and ask the women and girls in your community to do the same: https://t.co/c55LT113iJ

We are excited to join the conversation on #WCD2018

With today’s opening, we officially transitioned from 72nd to 73rd session of #UNGA. I’m so excited for the year ahead!

UNC Gillings alumna @TraciLBaird named CEO of EngenderHealth. Read full coverage here: https://t.co/l3oFl7PtBO @UNCpublichealth #SRHR

Until #familyplanning is a universally available choice in all settings, this human right will not be fully realized.

At #UNGA, @UNFPA and partners are calling for the fulfillment of this unrealized right: https://t.co/pjB2z7Ilwr

#StandUp4HumanRights

We love the pill & all other forms of contraception: allowing millions to plan & space pregnancies. How empowering is that?! #WheresTheFP

For World Contraception Day 2018 the Family Planning Voices team share stories that touch our hearts @EngenderHealth strives to put women & girls at the center of the development agenda. Read here: https://t.co/EpQhWKqiEq #FPVoices #SRHR #WCD2018 @K4Health

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Demand

The demand for FP exists in different forms; actual use of methods gives only a minimum estimate of total demand. Latent demand exists among two types of nonusers: those who wish to avoid pregnancy but are not currently using FP (those with an unmet need for FP), and those who might wish to avoid pregnancy if they had more information about the benefits of spacing or limiting births. For many, latent demand can be translated into actual use when programs advance positive attitudes toward FP/SRH, address myths and misconceptions, provide evidence-based information about FP/SRH-related issues and risks, and promote available services.

Individuals, families, and communities need the knowledge, capacity, and motivation to ensure FP/SRH and to encourage people to seek services. This requires a range of social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions—from reducing the direct and indirect costs of FP to mass media communication, community outreach, and peer education. Such SBCC approaches need to provide clear, factual, and unbiased information, so as to increase people’s knowledge and self-efficacy; promote communication among couples, among peers, and within families; and encourage people to seek care and use services. Further, such interventions should be synergistic and mutually reinforcing; this ensures that individuals and families receive consistent information and messages from a variety of different sources and in a range of formats.

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