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Our Work

We love this #vintage ad from @FPACharity advocating getting educated on #familyplanning ! It is as important today as it has ever been. #WheresTheFP #TBT

Pig intestines used as condoms?!? See this and more of History's Worst Contraceptives here: https://t.co/JZHqdN401r #WherestheFP #TBT

The face of vulnerability is adolescent girls & key populations. We need to think about #SDGs & what it means to live w full dignity. Prevention implies access to information, timely respectful services & understanding we are in a time of crisis. @UNFPA
https://t.co/7VcBKet57g

We love the implant & all other forms of #contraception allowing millions to plan & space #pregnancies. How #empowering is that?! #WheresTheFP

Our wisdom: increasing access to #familyplanning helps women go further in their education, work & life! #WheresTheFP

A 16-year-old girl living with HIV asked for a hug. This is how people responded.

#AIDS2018

Leaving no one behind means placing women at the center of the decision-making spaces in the HIV response. https://t.co/kNhzGjBbrp #AIDS2018 @AIDS_Conference

Breaking out of our echo chambers: cutting through the noise with creative storytelling about HIV. https://t.co/BiKfwjh98k. #AIDS2018

Human rights are far more than just inspiring words. They are the foundations of our progress, indispensable for peace and sustainable development. https://t.co/a1HgGD42zS via @antonioguterres

📷 UN Photo/JM Ferré

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Demand

The demand for FP exists in different forms; actual use of methods gives only a minimum estimate of total demand. Latent demand exists among two types of nonusers: those who wish to avoid pregnancy but are not currently using FP (those with an unmet need for FP), and those who might wish to avoid pregnancy if they had more information about the benefits of spacing or limiting births. For many, latent demand can be translated into actual use when programs advance positive attitudes toward FP/SRH, address myths and misconceptions, provide evidence-based information about FP/SRH-related issues and risks, and promote available services.

Individuals, families, and communities need the knowledge, capacity, and motivation to ensure FP/SRH and to encourage people to seek services. This requires a range of social and behavior change communication (SBCC) interventions—from reducing the direct and indirect costs of FP to mass media communication, community outreach, and peer education. Such SBCC approaches need to provide clear, factual, and unbiased information, so as to increase people’s knowledge and self-efficacy; promote communication among couples, among peers, and within families; and encourage people to seek care and use services. Further, such interventions should be synergistic and mutually reinforcing; this ensures that individuals and families receive consistent information and messages from a variety of different sources and in a range of formats.

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