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COVID-19: How We’re Responding

About Us

Through the @Hewlett_Found-supported project in West and Central Africa, we partner with @JVSAssociation in Bénin to create an enabling environment for youth access to #SRHR, including safe abortions.

Check out their "My Choice" twitter campaign! ⬇️

In anticipation of International Women’s Day on March 8, we’ll spend the week highlighting programs that are contributing to a more gender equal world. Stay tuned for #InternationalWomensDay Spotlights!

How we're advancing #genderequality through #SRHR: ➡️http://bit.ly/GE-SRHR

Addressing fistula is key to advancing #SRHR.

Since 2005, EngenderHealth has supported over 45,000 fistula repairs thanks to @USAID. Learn about advancements in fistula care across Africa & Asia at our event on March 8: http://bit.ly/FCPlus-Webinar

@fistulacare @USAIDGH #IWD2021

The @USAID-funded @fistulacare project takes a diverse approach to reducing barriers to fistula care. A key component of preventing fistula is expanding access to high-quality sexual and reproductive health services.

➡️Learn more: http://bit.ly/FCPlus-Webinar

#IWD2021 @USAIDGH

EngenderHealth supports capacity building & GBV awareness creation at Arbaminch Hospital, an integrated care center for GBV screening, counseling, treatment, and legal aid in Ethiopia. We were honored to host state officials to learn about successes & challenges in this model.

Yesterday, you heard about fistula from the @USAID-funded @fistulacare Plus project. To learn about how we’ve worked with partners to prevent & treat fistula over 15 years, join @fistulacare & @usaidGH for “Towards a Fistula-Free Future” on March 8!

➡️http://bit.ly/FCPlus-Webinar

Warmest congratulations to Linda Thomas-Greenfield, the new U.S. Ambassador to the @UN. We @UNFPA wish you every success and look forward to working with you to protect the health and advance the rights of women and girls around the world. @LindaT_G @USUN

http://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/23/us/politics/linda-thomas-greenfield-ambassador-united-nations.html

Also, mark your calendars for March 8, 2021! We are hosting a virtual event on #InternationalWomensDay entitled, “Towards a Fistula-Free Future: 15 Years of Breakthroughs and Program Impact.” Register today: http://bit.ly/FCPlus-Webinar

Thanks everyone! The FC+ website is a great place to start for more information and resources on fistula prevention and treatment, including research results, project reports, and stories from providers and clients. http://bit.ly/fistularesources https://twitter.com/EngenderHealth/status/1364608432880443393

Obstetric fistula is a beacon of inequality, as it occurs where women are already living with limited resources and access to healthcare. Additionally, once fistula occurs, women often face significant stigma and isolation which can impact their social and economic wellbeing. https://twitter.com/EngenderHealth/status/1364605591528886273

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Pay Gap Report

2020 Report

As part of our ongoing commitment to gender, equity, diversity, and inclusion, EngenderHealth has completed our second annual pay gap analysis with data from September 2020.

Following our first gender pay gap analysis in 2019, EngenderHealth finalized our GEDI policy and updated our compensation policy and salary grade structure for our offices, which included a detailed pay equity review. EngenderHealth also participates in the Global Health 50/50 and Fair Share of Women Leaders initiatives, both to demonstrate commitment and to learn from others across the sector about how organizations can improve on the journey to equality.

The gender pay gap represents the difference between the average pay of women and the average pay of men in an organization, irrespective of position. It is expressed as a percentage of the average pay for men. The pay gap is often an indicator of gender balance, or lack thereof, in the different staffing levels of an organization. Beginning this year, EngenderHealth also reports on the race/ethnicity pay gap for US staff.

Findings

Of 367 staff at the time the data were captured, 39% were women* and 61% were men*. The report includes data on EngenderHealth offices with 10 or more staff, noting that the small numbers of staff in some of these offices means that any one staff change in a position (whether from male to female or female to male) has a large influence on the results. For 2020, three offices have a positive (males earn more) pay gap; two have a negative (females earn more) pay gap.

For the first time, EngenderHealth conducted a race/ethnicity pay gap analysis for its US staff. Results show that Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) staff and white staff have an almost identical average pay, with a negative median pay gap, indicating that BIPOC staff are more represented in higher-paid positions in the organization.

The full report has country-by-country gender pay gap data and the US race/ethnicity pay gap data, along with additional context and commentary. Read reflections on the 2020 pay gap analysis by our President and CEO, Traci L. Baird, on our blog.

*As we’ve noted previously, gender pay gap analysis requires binary gender data, and we recognize that gender is not binary.


2019 Report

As part of our commitment to gender, equity, diversity, and inclusion EngenderHealth conducted its first gender pay gap analysis with data from September 2019.

The gender pay gap represents the difference between the average pay of women and the average pay of men in an organization, irrespective of job positions. It is expressed as a percentage of the average pay for men. The pay gap is often an indicator of gender balance (or imbalance) in leadership, middle-management, and lower-paying positions.

The gender pay gap is not the same as pay equity, or equal pay for equal work. Pay equity refers to men and women receiving the same pay for the same job, or for roles of the same value. EngenderHealth is committed to pay equity, and our systems for recruitment, hiring, and promotions are designed to ensure that we pay equally and fairly for equal jobs, irrespective of gender, race, religion, or other individual characteristics.

EngenderHealth has a strong, public commitment to equal employment opportunity and to gender, equity, diversity, and inclusion, as noted in policies and statements available here.

Findings

Out of 410 global staff members at the time the data were captured, 42% were women* and 58% were men.* Our CEO, two of four vice presidents, and four of seven country and regional representatives were women. Globally, our gender pay gap was negative (mean: -84%, median: -38%), reflecting more women than men (57% v. 43%) in the upper pay quartile and more men than women (74% to 26%) in the lower pay quartile.

The country-level data presented in the full report show that in five of the six EngenderHealth offices with ten or more staff, we have a reverse pay gap with women being paid more than men (i.e., negative median pay gap); in only one country do we have a traditional pay gap with men being paid more than women (i.e., positive median pay gap). We include more detail about our data and our reaction to the data here.

*We find the binary gender reporting to be limiting; we would like to explore ways to be more inclusive across the gender spectrum in the future to better align to our goal of being a gender-transformative organization.

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