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COVID-19: How We’re Responding

About Us

OPCU Director Marie Ba (@MissBa) will appear Friday, May 14th at 2:45 pm GMT, on @_51percent on @France24_en to discuss topics related the sexual and reproductive rights of women and girls in West Africa and beyond. Don't miss it.

The @Rutgers_INTL Gender-Transformative Approaches (GTA) Toolkit provides guidance for integrating GTA into communities, comprehensive sexuality education, youth friendly services, advocacy, and institutions, says @jeroenlorist (@RutgersNL).

View it here: http://bit.ly/Rutgers-GTA

"Rutgers knows it's crucial to engage men for gender justice, but also that only using this approach is binary & heteronormative. Therefore, we also focus on sexual & gender diversity to ensure the rights of marginalized groups are respected & fulfilled."

-@reyDP from @RutgersID

➡️@renugolwalkar says to effectively engage men & boys, we must frame gender inequality as a societal problem.

"There is not a problem with men & boys that we are trying to fix. The problem is the prevalence of harmful gender norms and power dynamics at every level of society."

Nick Danforth, a lifelong #SRHR advocate who managed the institute that won Roe v. Wade, outlines two priorities for gender-transformative SRHR programs:

1️⃣ Build local management
2️⃣ Demonstrate engaging men is cost-effective through increased data collection

#UbuntuSymposium

Renu Golwalkar, our Director of Gender, Youth & Social Inclusion, says gender-transformative change cannot be measured through contraception uptake or healthcare usage.

"The process is as important as the end goal. We must challenge existing gender stereotypes & power dynamics."

Why is engaging men important for achieving #GenderEquality?

Participants at our @MenEngage #UbuntuSymposium session say that change is more sustainable when all people are engaged, and that everyone has a stake in achieving gender equality because everyone benefits!👏👏

🚨30 MINUTES🚨

It’s not too late to register for our @MenEngage #UbuntuSymposium session with @Rutgers_INTL!

Join us for “The Past, Present, and Future of Engaging Men in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights” at 9am ET (3pm CET/CAT) ➡️ http://bit.ly/EH-Rutgers-Session

Don't forget to register for "Amplify Her Voice!" - EngenderHealth's virtual fundraiser for sexual and reproductive health and rights ➡️ http://bit.ly/AmplifyHerVoice

#Nurses are a fundamental part of providing safe, accessible, and affordable health care around the world. MOMENTUM helps to build the capacity of #HealthWorkers—including nurses—to transform the future of health care for #MomAndBaby. #IND2021 #VoiceToLead

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Pay Gap Report

2020 Report

As part of our ongoing commitment to gender, equity, diversity, and inclusion, EngenderHealth has completed our second annual pay gap analysis with data from September 2020.

Following our first gender pay gap analysis in 2019, EngenderHealth finalized our GEDI policy and updated our compensation policy and salary grade structure for our offices, which included a detailed pay equity review. EngenderHealth also participates in the Global Health 50/50 and Fair Share of Women Leaders initiatives, both to demonstrate commitment and to learn from others across the sector about how organizations can improve on the journey to equality.

The gender pay gap represents the difference between the average pay of women and the average pay of men in an organization, irrespective of position. It is expressed as a percentage of the average pay for men. The pay gap is often an indicator of gender balance, or lack thereof, in the different staffing levels of an organization. Beginning this year, EngenderHealth also reports on the race/ethnicity pay gap for US staff.

Findings

Of 367 staff at the time the data were captured, 39% were women* and 61% were men*. The report includes data on EngenderHealth offices with 10 or more staff, noting that the small numbers of staff in some of these offices means that any one staff change in a position (whether from male to female or female to male) has a large influence on the results. For 2020, three offices have a positive (males earn more) pay gap; two have a negative (females earn more) pay gap.

For the first time, EngenderHealth conducted a race/ethnicity pay gap analysis for its US staff. Results show that Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) staff and white staff have an almost identical average pay, with a negative median pay gap, indicating that BIPOC staff are more represented in higher-paid positions in the organization.

The full report has country-by-country gender pay gap data and the US race/ethnicity pay gap data, along with additional context and commentary. Read reflections on the 2020 pay gap analysis by our President and CEO, Traci L. Baird, on our blog.

*As we’ve noted previously, gender pay gap analysis requires binary gender data, and we recognize that gender is not binary.


2019 Report

As part of our commitment to gender, equity, diversity, and inclusion EngenderHealth conducted its first gender pay gap analysis with data from September 2019.

The gender pay gap represents the difference between the average pay of women and the average pay of men in an organization, irrespective of job positions. It is expressed as a percentage of the average pay for men. The pay gap is often an indicator of gender balance (or imbalance) in leadership, middle-management, and lower-paying positions.

The gender pay gap is not the same as pay equity, or equal pay for equal work. Pay equity refers to men and women receiving the same pay for the same job, or for roles of the same value. EngenderHealth is committed to pay equity, and our systems for recruitment, hiring, and promotions are designed to ensure that we pay equally and fairly for equal jobs, irrespective of gender, race, religion, or other individual characteristics.

EngenderHealth has a strong, public commitment to equal employment opportunity and to gender, equity, diversity, and inclusion, as noted in policies and statements available here.

Findings

Out of 410 global staff members at the time the data were captured, 42% were women* and 58% were men.* Our CEO, two of four vice presidents, and four of seven country and regional representatives were women. Globally, our gender pay gap was negative (mean: -84%, median: -38%), reflecting more women than men (57% v. 43%) in the upper pay quartile and more men than women (74% to 26%) in the lower pay quartile.

The country-level data presented in the full report show that in five of the six EngenderHealth offices with ten or more staff, we have a reverse pay gap with women being paid more than men (i.e., negative median pay gap); in only one country do we have a traditional pay gap with men being paid more than women (i.e., positive median pay gap). We include more detail about our data and our reaction to the data here.

*We find the binary gender reporting to be limiting; we would like to explore ways to be more inclusive across the gender spectrum in the future to better align to our goal of being a gender-transformative organization.

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