[ Skip to Main Content ]
COVID-19: How We’re Responding

About Us

Meet the 2021 3rd @TzHealthSummit Youth Capacity Building Program facilitators: @RehemaGeorge7 and @MasakoPrudence (@EngenderHealth); @Theddylp (@HealiTZambia), and yours truly (@Jhpiego). Pls show some ❤️ to these selfless #leaders I was blessed to work alongside🙏🏽

Honored to have facilitated the 3rd @TzHealthSummit youth capacity building program alongside @Theddylp @charleswanga. Proud to have been part of nurturing other youth leaders to take up space in the world and cement themselves #THS2021 @EngenderHealth @YouthDeliver

J'ai eu l'honneur d'aborder la thématique des violences domestiques en #CIV225 avec @Sylvia_Apata sur les ondes de Radio Yopougon et notamment le projet de lois relatif à la protection des victimes de violences domestiques.
#ProjetLoiVBG
#TousUnis

@EngenderHealth @CACi225

"This has become an ideological issue. As countries become more partisan, as countries become more ideological on each side, women's bodies are used as a pawn in this war between two parties or three parties."
#SRHR #ReproductiveRights

http://ow.ly/es7Q50Gr5Wr

"...[CSE programs]reinforce our human rights to autonomy, teach youth that sexual violence is not ok & provide young people with information about how to recognize and respond to sexual violence if it were to happen in the future." 💯 🙌 👏
http://ow.ly/Qlsh50Gqptk

Today, 400,000 Nigerian women—representing 40% of obstetric #fistula cases worldwide—wait for corrective surgery. In #Nigeria, MOMENTUM Safe Surgery is partnering w/ gov't, institutions, and local organizations to confront this preventable problem. @USAIDNigeria @PaulineKTallen

Salma advocates to end stigma & discrimination against people living w/ HIV in #Tanzania. She uses skills learned through the Boresha Afya project funded by @USAIDTanzania & administered by @EGPAF in partnership with EngenderHealth & the Tanzania Ministry of Health. #DayoftheGirl

In response to #Pandemics we need Public Private partnerships in cofinancing the health sector so that no one is left behind.

Dr. @MasakoPrudence from @EngenderHealth
#THS2021

Today in the US is #IndigenousPeoplesDay, which celebrates the contributions, diverse cultures, and resiliency of Indigenous people. Learn more about the holiday & what it means to 5 Indigenous women and two-spirit people.

http://ow.ly/Skan50GoTxb

Members of our team are presenting at the Tanzania Health Summit this week. Follow along and watch the conference live on YouTube. #THS2021 #Tanzania

Load More...

Pay Gap Report

2020 Report

As part of our ongoing commitment to gender, equity, diversity, and inclusion, EngenderHealth has completed our second annual pay gap analysis with data from September 2020.

Following our first gender pay gap analysis in 2019, EngenderHealth finalized our GEDI policy and updated our compensation policy and salary grade structure for our offices, which included a detailed pay equity review. EngenderHealth also participates in the Global Health 50/50 and Fair Share of Women Leaders initiatives, both to demonstrate commitment and to learn from others across the sector about how organizations can improve on the journey to equality.

The gender pay gap represents the difference between the average pay of women and the average pay of men in an organization, irrespective of position. It is expressed as a percentage of the average pay for men. The pay gap is often an indicator of gender balance, or lack thereof, in the different staffing levels of an organization. Beginning this year, EngenderHealth also reports on the race/ethnicity pay gap for US staff.

Findings

Of 367 staff at the time the data were captured, 39% were women* and 61% were men*. The report includes data on EngenderHealth offices with 10 or more staff, noting that the small numbers of staff in some of these offices means that any one staff change in a position (whether from male to female or female to male) has a large influence on the results. For 2020, three offices have a positive (males earn more) pay gap; two have a negative (females earn more) pay gap.

For the first time, EngenderHealth conducted a race/ethnicity pay gap analysis for its US staff. Results show that Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) staff and white staff have an almost identical average pay, with a negative median pay gap, indicating that BIPOC staff are more represented in higher-paid positions in the organization.

The full report has country-by-country gender pay gap data and the US race/ethnicity pay gap data, along with additional context and commentary. Read reflections on the 2020 pay gap analysis by our President and CEO, Traci L. Baird, on our blog.

*As we’ve noted previously, gender pay gap analysis requires binary gender data, and we recognize that gender is not binary.


2019 Report

As part of our commitment to gender, equity, diversity, and inclusion EngenderHealth conducted its first gender pay gap analysis with data from September 2019.

The gender pay gap represents the difference between the average pay of women and the average pay of men in an organization, irrespective of job positions. It is expressed as a percentage of the average pay for men. The pay gap is often an indicator of gender balance (or imbalance) in leadership, middle-management, and lower-paying positions.

The gender pay gap is not the same as pay equity, or equal pay for equal work. Pay equity refers to men and women receiving the same pay for the same job, or for roles of the same value. EngenderHealth is committed to pay equity, and our systems for recruitment, hiring, and promotions are designed to ensure that we pay equally and fairly for equal jobs, irrespective of gender, race, religion, or other individual characteristics.

EngenderHealth has a strong, public commitment to equal employment opportunity and to gender, equity, diversity, and inclusion, as noted in policies and statements available here.

Findings

Out of 410 global staff members at the time the data were captured, 42% were women* and 58% were men.* Our CEO, two of four vice presidents, and four of seven country and regional representatives were women. Globally, our gender pay gap was negative (mean: -84%, median: -38%), reflecting more women than men (57% v. 43%) in the upper pay quartile and more men than women (74% to 26%) in the lower pay quartile.

The country-level data presented in the full report show that in five of the six EngenderHealth offices with ten or more staff, we have a reverse pay gap with women being paid more than men (i.e., negative median pay gap); in only one country do we have a traditional pay gap with men being paid more than women (i.e., positive median pay gap). We include more detail about our data and our reaction to the data here.

*We find the binary gender reporting to be limiting; we would like to explore ways to be more inclusive across the gender spectrum in the future to better align to our goal of being a gender-transformative organization.

Share this page: