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A wave of youth-led feminism is spreading across West and Central Africa (WCA). How can EngenderHealth and other iNGOs partner with #youth activists and feminist orgs in #WCA to advance #SRHR?

Check out our brief on supporting feminist actors in WCA ▶️ http://bit.ly/WCABrief-EH

OPCU Director Marie Ba (@MissBa) will appear Friday, May 14th at 2:45 pm GMT, on @_51percent on @France24_en to discuss topics related the sexual and reproductive rights of women and girls in West Africa and beyond. Don't miss it.

The @Rutgers_INTL Gender-Transformative Approaches (GTA) Toolkit provides guidance for integrating GTA into communities, comprehensive sexuality education, youth friendly services, advocacy, and institutions, says @jeroenlorist (@RutgersNL).

View it here: http://bit.ly/Rutgers-GTA

"Rutgers knows it's crucial to engage men for gender justice, but also that only using this approach is binary & heteronormative. Therefore, we also focus on sexual & gender diversity to ensure the rights of marginalized groups are respected & fulfilled."

-@reyDP from @RutgersID

➡️@renugolwalkar says to effectively engage men & boys, we must frame gender inequality as a societal problem.

"There is not a problem with men & boys that we are trying to fix. The problem is the prevalence of harmful gender norms and power dynamics at every level of society."

Nick Danforth, a lifelong #SRHR advocate who managed the institute that won Roe v. Wade, outlines two priorities for gender-transformative SRHR programs:

1️⃣ Build local management
2️⃣ Demonstrate engaging men is cost-effective through increased data collection

#UbuntuSymposium

Renu Golwalkar, our Director of Gender, Youth & Social Inclusion, says gender-transformative change cannot be measured through contraception uptake or healthcare usage.

"The process is as important as the end goal. We must challenge existing gender stereotypes & power dynamics."

Why is engaging men important for achieving #GenderEquality?

Participants at our @MenEngage #UbuntuSymposium session say that change is more sustainable when all people are engaged, and that everyone has a stake in achieving gender equality because everyone benefits!👏👏

🚨30 MINUTES🚨

It’s not too late to register for our @MenEngage #UbuntuSymposium session with @Rutgers_INTL!

Join us for “The Past, Present, and Future of Engaging Men in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights” at 9am ET (3pm CET/CAT) ➡️ http://bit.ly/EH-Rutgers-Session

Don't forget to register for "Amplify Her Voice!" - EngenderHealth's virtual fundraiser for sexual and reproductive health and rights ➡️ http://bit.ly/AmplifyHerVoice

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Eclampsia and Pre-Eclampsia

Giving birth should be a time for celebration, but for more than half a million women each year—one every 90 seconds—pregnancy and childbirth end in death and mourning. Ninety-nine percent of these deaths occur in developing countries, and nearly all are preventable.

One of the leading causes of maternal death is pre-eclampsia—the rapid elevation of blood pressure during pregnancy—which, if untreated, can lead to seizures (eclampsia), kidney and liver damage, and ultimately, death. Eclampsia and severe pre-eclampsia claim the lives of an estimated 63,000 women each year, as well as the lives of many of their babies.  

A Ready Solution
The World Health Organization recognizes and recommends injectable magnesium sulfate—also known as Epsom salts—as the safest, most effective, and lowest-cost medication for treating pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. Magnesium sulfate is the standard treatment for these conditions in the developed world and has been for 20 years. Less-effective and riskier medications (such as diazepam and phenytoin), however, are still widely used in developing countries—if any treatment is available at all.

 

OUR COMMITMENT
We commit to reducing maternal mortality with magnesium sulfate in India, Mexico, and Nigeria. Through training, advocacy, and education, we will increase access to the lifesaving treatment for pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, leading causes of maternal mortality.

 

 

Clinton Global Initiative Commitment
This disparity must end. EngenderHealth, the University of Oxford, and the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation are making a joint commitment as part of the Clinton Global Initiative to expand access to magnesium sulfate by:

  • Training health professionals through web-based interactive programs on when and how to administer magnesium sulfate
  • Advocating for magnesium sulfate to be part of every developing country’s list of essential drugs
  • Helping develop and/or reinforce national protocols mandating magnesium sulfate as the preferred treatment for pre-eclampsia and eclampsia
  • Ensuring the availability of magnesium sulfate in hospitals

Call to Action
In 2007, EngenderHealth and the University of Oxford brought together leading scientists, advocates, researchers, and representatives of the WHO, UNICEF, United Nations agencies, and national ministries of health from around the world to identify barriers to the availability and use of magnesium sulfate to treat pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. This historic gathering of global public health experts identified the primary barriers to be a lack of national guidelines, a shortage of educated and trained health care professionals, and scarce supplies of magnesium sulfate.

Based on these conclusions, EngenderHealth and the University of Oxford developed a “Call to Action” and report that called on policy makers and ministers of health to make pre-eclampsia and eclampsia a higher priority and to set national guidelines for treatment and care based on WHO guidelines. Decision makers and international and national health organizations and agencies were also urged to help make magnesium sulfate more available and affordable.

The full report, Balancing the Scales: Expanding Treatment for Pregnant Women with Life-Threatening Hypertensive Conditions in Developing Countries, is available for download (PDF, 316KB), as is the International Call to Action (PDF, 27KB).

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