[ Skip to Main Content ]

Our Work

Highlights from @UNFPA report:
1) 214 million women can’t access contraceptives
2) 4 in 10 women fear saying no to sexual demands
3) 59% of women use modern contraceptives, up 6% from 25 years ago
#SWOP2019 #SRHR https://t.co/A1OvRILmZz

In our last fiscal year, over 17,000 healthcare providers have gained access to tools, knowledge, and expertise to provide millions of women with the sexual and reproductive healthcare they need to thrive. #SRHR

@EngenderHealth #Tanzania &#ThaminiUhai with the generous support of @BloombergDotOrg have been working jointly with the government in Kigoma to improve maternal health by tupgrading health centers, providing CEMonC training and mentorship to staff and creating public awareness

New study finds that women in Africa face higher risks of death from C-sections mainly due to understaffed hospitals and under-trained doctors. https://t.co/PRpQngkcIE #maternalhealth

Every day approx 830 women die from preventable causes related to pregnancy. EngenderHealth is committed to changing this. We equip health facilities with well-trained staff and medical supplies to give women the high-quality #maternalhealthcare they deserve. #IntlMHDay

Lauri Romanzi @DrRomanzi, Project Director of @EngenderHealth USAID funded Fistula Care Plus project, will speak about revising a strategy to end fistula within a generation at #RCOG2019.
Find out more: https://t.co/zhJKKbyOW4

When mothers thrive, families thrive, communities thrive and nations thrive. Thanks to our amazing partners, #Tanzania Ministry of Health, PORALG, @ThaminiUhai @EngenderHealth, @VitalStrat and @CDCGlobal for all you do to support mothers. https://t.co/HIIHWiaNIa

@EngenderHealth a organisé en #CôtedIvoire un Meet-up sur les Droits en Santé sexuelle et reproductive #SSR à l’endroit des acteurs de la société civile, œuvrant dans cet univers sur les pratiques d’avortement.
#PO2019
https://t.co/CvrN6HORiA

#Familyplanning: 🔑 to achieving #HealthForAll. Women. Young People. Children. Expanding access to family planning in universal health care= ⬆️ health & wellbeing

Tanzanian MP Mayeye is a champion for #maternalhealth + #reprohealth in Tanzania. She recently visited some health facilities we support w/ @EngenderHealth + @ThaminiUhai, and is calling for the gov't to increase their support for services. https://t.co/4AXUF0l0Nb

Load More...

Eclampsia and Pre-Eclampsia

Giving birth should be a time for celebration, but for more than half a million women each year—one every 90 seconds—pregnancy and childbirth end in death and mourning. Ninety-nine percent of these deaths occur in developing countries, and nearly all are preventable.

One of the leading causes of maternal death is pre-eclampsia—the rapid elevation of blood pressure during pregnancy—which, if untreated, can lead to seizures (eclampsia), kidney and liver damage, and ultimately, death. Eclampsia and severe pre-eclampsia claim the lives of an estimated 63,000 women each year, as well as the lives of many of their babies.  

A Ready Solution
The World Health Organization recognizes and recommends injectable magnesium sulfate—also known as Epsom salts—as the safest, most effective, and lowest-cost medication for treating pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. Magnesium sulfate is the standard treatment for these conditions in the developed world and has been for 20 years. Less-effective and riskier medications (such as diazepam and phenytoin), however, are still widely used in developing countries—if any treatment is available at all.

 

OUR COMMITMENT
We commit to reducing maternal mortality with magnesium sulfate in India, Mexico, and Nigeria. Through training, advocacy, and education, we will increase access to the lifesaving treatment for pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, leading causes of maternal mortality.

 

 

Clinton Global Initiative Commitment
This disparity must end. EngenderHealth, the University of Oxford, and the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation are making a joint commitment as part of the Clinton Global Initiative to expand access to magnesium sulfate by:

  • Training health professionals through web-based interactive programs on when and how to administer magnesium sulfate
  • Advocating for magnesium sulfate to be part of every developing country’s list of essential drugs
  • Helping develop and/or reinforce national protocols mandating magnesium sulfate as the preferred treatment for pre-eclampsia and eclampsia
  • Ensuring the availability of magnesium sulfate in hospitals

Call to Action
In 2007, EngenderHealth and the University of Oxford brought together leading scientists, advocates, researchers, and representatives of the WHO, UNICEF, United Nations agencies, and national ministries of health from around the world to identify barriers to the availability and use of magnesium sulfate to treat pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. This historic gathering of global public health experts identified the primary barriers to be a lack of national guidelines, a shortage of educated and trained health care professionals, and scarce supplies of magnesium sulfate.

Based on these conclusions, EngenderHealth and the University of Oxford developed a “Call to Action” and report that called on policy makers and ministers of health to make pre-eclampsia and eclampsia a higher priority and to set national guidelines for treatment and care based on WHO guidelines. Decision makers and international and national health organizations and agencies were also urged to help make magnesium sulfate more available and affordable.

The full report, Balancing the Scales: Expanding Treatment for Pregnant Women with Life-Threatening Hypertensive Conditions in Developing Countries, is available for download (PDF, 316KB), as is the International Call to Action (PDF, 27KB).

Share this page: