[ Skip to Main Content ]

Our Work

Thanks to our vocational training program in Malawi, young women like Bertha can gain the skills to support their families while learning about #genderequality. Meet Bertha: https://t.co/KLowhRfQF5 #GBV

Five ways women, and the world, are held back when both men and women lack access to sexual and #reprohealth education and safe, voluntary #familyplanning methods: https://t.co/vfrNHirqEU

In our Austin-area adolescent sexual health program Re:MIX, young parents are peer educators, working w/ health educators & telling their stories. @SXSW @SXSWEDU peeps—check out this session in the #SXSWEDU #PanelPicker (and vote!): https://t.co/ovGTS1BBOY #YouthDay #SexEducation

Through our PhotoVoice project, Re:MIX youth Peer Educators are able to reflect on their own #SRHR experiences and in turn, better help students process sexual and gender content. https://t.co/kKxny6JSTi #youthday

6000 adolescent girls and young women become infected with HIV every week. Education plays a critical role in ensuring young women and girls have access to the HIV prevention info and services they need. https://t.co/gecJP98ZGx #YouthDay #TransformingEducation

[Blog] On #InternationalYouthDay we celebrate comprehensive life skills education for young ppl to support their right to gender-equitable sexual & reproductive health services & participating as equal members in society: https://t.co/A56ExV4Aqr

#youthday #SRHR

She has the right.

To information. To health care. To choose.

On #InternationalYouthDay we say that every girl and young woman must have access to sexual education. So she can make decisions about her body, her life & her future.

Only then can we truly #TransformEducation

We stand with you, Dr. Kanem (@Atayeshe) and @UNFPA!

Here's our #youthday blog on youth, #SRHR, and #genderequality: https://t.co/A56ExV4Aqr

"The potential of young people is limitless, if we can more effectively reach these young people with accurate, appropriate information and services that respect, protect, and fulfill their #humanrights." - Ana Aguilera, EngenderHealth https://t.co/2pnBT5BkE0 #youthday

Looking for resources on #SRHR for youth?

See our Key Topics page for a collection of papers related to Young People and SRHR: https://t.co/4JipIW4MyD

#EvidenceMatters #YouthDay #Adolescent

Load More...

COPE®

COPE® (client-oriented, provider-efficient services) is a relatively simple process for improving quality in health services. COPE encourages and enables service providers and other staff at a facility to assess the services they provide jointly with their supervisors. Using various tools, they identify problems, find the root causes, and develop effective solutions. Although going through this process of self-assessment is not training to perform tasks correctly, it makes the participants aware of good practices because the assessment guides are based on international standards. Equally important, the self-assessment approach creates involvement and ownership in the quality improvement process.

COPE is cost-effective and does not involve large investments of time because some activities may be conducted while staff carry out their routine work. It is also results-oriented.

The COPE tools include:

  • A series of self-assessment guides, including a record-review checklist
  • Client-interview guides
  • Client-flow analysis
  • Action plan

COPE was originally developed for family planning clinics in Kenya and Nigeria in 1988, and since then has been introduced in 50 countries around the world, with proven success. Over the years, the COPE tools have been adapted for a wide range of health services.

How Is COPE Implemented?
The first COPE exercise at a site is completed over a period of two to three days. A facilitator conducts the introduction with site supervisors, who, at the same time, learn to facilitate the process so that they will be able to conduct follow-up sessions and also introduce the COPE process elsewhere. The introduction begins with an exercise to define quality services by asking providers to articulate how they expect to be treated when seeking health services.

  • Staff use 10 self-assessment guides containing several trigger questions. The guides are based on the clients’ rights and staff’s needs framework. At larger sites, the staff break up into teams assessing the services they provide according to one or two guides each. Small sites (fewer than 10 people) may conduct the self-assessment over a few weeks along with their regular work, using one or two guides at a time.
  • The client interviews were developed to increase staff’s understanding of the client perspective. To help staff “break the ice,” COPE includes a guide for conducting interviews with clients. (Sites using COPE are increasingly expanding their definition of customers to include nonusers of the services and the community overall, and to solicit their opinions as well. In addition, internal customers–such as fellow workers not participating in the actual COPE exercise–may also be interviewed using the self-assessment guides.)
  • The self-assessment guides and client interviews provide staff with information to identify problems related to the service-delivery process and to develop an action plan. Staff identify and state the problems, their root causes, and appropriate solutions. The action plan also contains information on assignments for staff to take responsibility for given actions and dates by when actions will be completed.

Finally, the institutionalization of COPE requires establishing a COPE committee. Some organizations have vested this responsibility with already existing committees or teams. Any type of quality improvement is a long-term process. To nurture this process, it is important to ensure site follow-up and management support.

EngenderHealth’s COPE® Handbook: A Process for Improving Quality in Health Services, Revised Edition (2003) is a resource to help COPE facilitators orient managers, train site facilitators, guide facility staff in using the COPE tools, and adapt the COPE process and tools to best fit a facility’s needs. This revised and improved version of the classic 1995 COPE handbook is more focused on the “how-to” aspects of performing COPE exercises and contains more information on orienting key managers, on helping facilitators prepare for the COPE process, and on enhancing facilitation skills.

To accompany the new COPE handbook, EngenderHealth has developed a number of content-specific COPE toolbooks containing the self-assessment guides, record-review checklists, client-interview guides, and client-flow analysis forms needed to conduct a COPE exercise. These toolbooks cover such areas as reproductive health, family planning, maternal health, adolescent reproductive health, cervical cancer screening, and HIV and sexually transmitted infection services. A full list is available in our Publications and Resources.

Share this page: