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Our Work

A wave of youth-led feminism is spreading across West and Central Africa (WCA). How can EngenderHealth and other iNGOs partner with #youth activists and feminist orgs in #WCA to advance #SRHR?

Check out our brief on supporting feminist actors in WCA ▶️ http://bit.ly/WCABrief-EH

OPCU Director Marie Ba (@MissBa) will appear Friday, May 14th at 2:45 pm GMT, on @_51percent on @France24_en to discuss topics related the sexual and reproductive rights of women and girls in West Africa and beyond. Don't miss it.

The @Rutgers_INTL Gender-Transformative Approaches (GTA) Toolkit provides guidance for integrating GTA into communities, comprehensive sexuality education, youth friendly services, advocacy, and institutions, says @jeroenlorist (@RutgersNL).

View it here: http://bit.ly/Rutgers-GTA

"Rutgers knows it's crucial to engage men for gender justice, but also that only using this approach is binary & heteronormative. Therefore, we also focus on sexual & gender diversity to ensure the rights of marginalized groups are respected & fulfilled."

-@reyDP from @RutgersID

➡️@renugolwalkar says to effectively engage men & boys, we must frame gender inequality as a societal problem.

"There is not a problem with men & boys that we are trying to fix. The problem is the prevalence of harmful gender norms and power dynamics at every level of society."

Nick Danforth, a lifelong #SRHR advocate who managed the institute that won Roe v. Wade, outlines two priorities for gender-transformative SRHR programs:

1️⃣ Build local management
2️⃣ Demonstrate engaging men is cost-effective through increased data collection

#UbuntuSymposium

Renu Golwalkar, our Director of Gender, Youth & Social Inclusion, says gender-transformative change cannot be measured through contraception uptake or healthcare usage.

"The process is as important as the end goal. We must challenge existing gender stereotypes & power dynamics."

Why is engaging men important for achieving #GenderEquality?

Participants at our @MenEngage #UbuntuSymposium session say that change is more sustainable when all people are engaged, and that everyone has a stake in achieving gender equality because everyone benefits!👏👏

🚨30 MINUTES🚨

It’s not too late to register for our @MenEngage #UbuntuSymposium session with @Rutgers_INTL!

Join us for “The Past, Present, and Future of Engaging Men in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights” at 9am ET (3pm CET/CAT) ➡️ http://bit.ly/EH-Rutgers-Session

Don't forget to register for "Amplify Her Voice!" - EngenderHealth's virtual fundraiser for sexual and reproductive health and rights ➡️ http://bit.ly/AmplifyHerVoice

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Overview

Gender influences women’s and men’s health in fundamental ways; harmful and rigid expectations about what men and women can or should do can place both women’s and men’s health at risk. For example, gender norms that define men as strong may discourage them from seeking health services as they might view asking for help from a nurse or doctor as a sign of weakness. Similarly, norms characterizing women as submissive can undermine their ability to negotiate condom use with male partners. Other consequences associated with the complex interplay of harmful gender norms include depression, gender-based violence (GBV), early marriage, unintended pregnancy, and increased risk of HIV.

EngenderHealth seeks to ensure that every program has taken steps to address how gender inequalities impact their programs and desired health outcomes.

Since 1996, we have pioneered programs that challenge gender inequities and transform gender norms in ways that promote health and social justice (using gender-transformative strategies). For example, our Men As Partners program engages men and boys to promote gender equality and prevent violence against women. This award-winning approach has been implemented in more than 30 countries across Asia and Africa and in the United States.

In addition, we are implementing gender programs that purposefully promote equality among both men/boys and women/girls, with the understanding that both sexes need to be engaged in redefining gender norms within their communities. This gender-synchronized approach is unique, as most gender programs focus on just men or women. To date, we have implemented and evaluated successful gender-synchronized programs in Angola, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and the United States.

EngenderHealth also undertakes broader advocacy efforts, including our role as a founding member of MenEngage, a global alliance committed to research, interventions, and policy efforts aimed at engaging men and boys in gender equality.

Current gender activities include:

Burundi: We are working to prevent and respond to GBV by engaging men and boys; training health care sites to better provide GBV services; and supporting improved national coordination of GBV response and prevention efforts, among other activities.

Tanzania: We are currently a partner in an HIV project working toward reducing vulnerabilities for men who have sex with men, female sex workers, and adolescent girls. We also increased men’s involvement in HIV prevention by reducing high-risk sexual behaviors, promoting fidelity, reducing men’s number of sexual partners, eliminating GBV, and increasing the use of sexual and reproductive health services.

Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) Prevention Research: We have developed IPV prevention curricula for men, women, and couples as part of two randomized controlled trials, in Tanzania (with the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) and in Ethiopia (with J-PAL). Both studies are ongoing; results will be available by 2017.

Texas: We are working with adolescents to address teen pregnancy prevention by looking at the impacts of gender norms on sexual behaviors.

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