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Our Work

The @whatwomenwanthc campaign is calling on young women and girls around the world to share what’s important to them when it comes to maternal and #reproductivehealth. Take the survey and ask the women and girls in your community to do the same: https://t.co/c55LT113iJ

We are excited to join the conversation on #WCD2018

With today’s opening, we officially transitioned from 72nd to 73rd session of #UNGA. I’m so excited for the year ahead!

UNC Gillings alumna @TraciLBaird named CEO of EngenderHealth. Read full coverage here: https://t.co/l3oFl7PtBO @UNCpublichealth #SRHR

Until #familyplanning is a universally available choice in all settings, this human right will not be fully realized.

At #UNGA, @UNFPA and partners are calling for the fulfillment of this unrealized right: https://t.co/pjB2z7Ilwr

#StandUp4HumanRights

We love the pill & all other forms of contraception: allowing millions to plan & space pregnancies. How empowering is that?! #WheresTheFP

For World Contraception Day 2018 the Family Planning Voices team share stories that touch our hearts @EngenderHealth strives to put women & girls at the center of the development agenda. Read here: https://t.co/EpQhWKqiEq #FPVoices #SRHR #WCD2018 @K4Health

The issue of #familyplanning is about women’s agency.

Even if a service is available in the community, it’s not effective if women cannot access it. #EWECisME @WorldBank

Are you optimistic about the future? @BillGates and @melindagates are. Read what they have to say and dig into the Goalkeepers Report to learn about the progress we’re making and the generation of leaders making it possible. #Goalkeepers18 https://t.co/7rXvZqPsf6

Expanding access to #contraception & #familyplanning programs is one of the most cost-effective ways to break the cycle of poverty." #FP2020

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Fistula

Fistula is a hole that develops between the birth canal and one or more of a woman’s internal organs. While it is almost always preventable, fistula is all too common in the developing world, where it is estimated to affect more than 2 million girls and women.

Consequences of fistula are life-altering: For women with obstetric fistula, the baby usually dies during labor, and the mother is left with chronic incontinence, often leading to isolation from family and community life and neglect or abandonment by male partners. Without surgical repair, a woman’s prospects for work or family support are greatly diminished, and she is often left to rely on charity. These problems are compounded in cases of traumatic fistula, which is caused by rape or sexual violence. In these cases, women face greater psychological trauma and increased vulnerability to HIV or other sexually transmitted infections.

In up to 90% of cases, the fistula can be surgically repaired. Through the Fistula Care Plus project, the largest U.S. government-funded effort to date dedicated to treating and preventing fistula, EngenderHealth works to restore dignity to women with fistula and to prevent other women from developing the condition. Our activities include:

 
Treating Fistula

  • Increasing the number of providers able to surgically repair fistula  
  • Upgrading medical equipment and supplies at health facilities to ensure high-quality care for women receiving surgical repair for fistula
  • Improving providers’ skills in counseling fistula clients
  • Supporting women as the reenter family and community life

Preventing Fistula

  • Upgrading emergency obstetric care to prevent obstetric fistula
  • Increasing awareness at the community level about fistula prevention and the importance of maternal health care
  • Improving access to family planning
  • Advocating policy changes that tackle the root causes of obstetric fistula, such as delays in accessing emergency obstetric care
  • Promoting gender equity and reducing violence against women

For nearly a decade, EngenderHealth has partnered with institutions and surgical teams to facilitate more than 25,000 fistula repair surgeries, transforming the lives of women and their families in 15 countries across Africa and Asia. These surgeries have been possible with support from USAID and other generous donors. Currently, we have fistula activities in 10 countries in partnership with other international organizations, local nongovernmental organizations, faith-based organizations, public-sector clinics, and national working groups on safe motherhood.

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