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Are you thinking about a summer getaway? If so, Travel with WTFP - upload a selfie & tag us! https://t.co/HtLly6JA6s #WherestheFP

Jafta never had a male role model. Now he is one in #SouthAfrica! Read more: https://t.co/WuyARMyKSV #MenAsPartners

The @UN has a particular responsibility to lead by example in ensuring the equal & active participation of women at all levels.

We're working towards this goal every day, everywhere: https://t.co/Cpdl0psGko

“Reaching women and girls affected by crises with #familyplanning must be understood as a critical rights issue.” More from Jenn Schlecht, FP2020 Senior Advisor, Emergency Preparedness and Response: https://t.co/MOP6URhoLf #WRD2018 #WeAreFP2020

YES! This vintage ad from 1995 Mexico promotes the many #familyplanning options to choose from! #TBT #WheresTheFP

•Let's acknowledge the link between the #GlobalGoals, equality for women, and peace #WheresTheFP

Wise words from our #WCW , the fabulous @jk_rowling! Take power into your own hands & advocate for #ReproHealth: https://t.co/vPrn5at4Hd #WheresTheFP

Rashida survived her last pregnancy thanks to counseling from an EngenderHealth-trained health worker! https://t.co/5T7UtXgTHU

At least 1 in 5 refugees or displaced women in complex humanitarian settings have experienced sexual violence. This #WorldRefugeeDay, demand policies that can ensure their safety! #WithRefugees

“I don’t want to get married now. I want to become an architect,” says Yanal (16), a Syrian refugee in Jordan.

On #WorldRefugeeDay, we’re proud to stand #WithRefugees like Yanal who want to take notes in class not take vows in marriage: https://t.co/t24r3rEwgu

#ENDChildMarriage

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Learn from My Story

In August 2007, the ACQUIRE Project (managed by EngenderHealth) partnered with the Center for Digital Storytelling and St. Joseph’s Hospital in Uganda to coordinate a workshop for Ugandan women who have experienced obstetric fistula.

At an orientation session held one month prior to the workshop, participants were given disposable cameras, taught how to use them, and asked to take photos of their homes and villages. During a subsequent four-day workshop, they shared their stories with one another in a group process, recorded narration, and drew pictures to illustrate their lives. A team of trainers combined the photos with the drawn images, as well as video shot on location. While editing was underway, participants visited the hospital where they had been treated and offered advice and support to women awaiting repair. The workshop ended with a screening of the stories and testimony by participants about their increased sense of self-worth and desire to speak out in their villages about fistula repair and prevention.

These videos recount hardships and celebrate achievements related to the participant’s daily struggles with pregnancy, loss, and relationships, as well as their search for safety, acceptance, and dignity.  Our hope is that viewers will come away with greater compassion, as well as an understanding of what causes fistula, how women can be repaired, and why community members, the health sector, and policymakers all have critical roles to play in prevention.

This workshop was coordinated by the ACQUIRE Project and made possible by the generous support of the American people through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), under the terms of cooperative agreement GPO-A-00-03-00006-00.

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