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Our Work

Today is #GivingTuesday, a day to give back & to kick off the giving season. You can give the gift of safe, secure #reproductivehealth to women and girls around the world, and whatever amount you give, it will be doubled.
#familyplanning
#SRHR

Sexual and gender-based violence undermines the health, dignity, security and autonomy of women and girls.
Yet #SGBV remains shrouded in a culture of silence.
📣 Speaking out
brings us a step closer towards justice & healing.

We’re inspired! Over the last four days, we asked delegates at #ICFP2018 to share their commitments to #familyplanning. We heard from youth advocates, leaders, activists, scientists, researchers, and more!

Follow us on Instagram to see what they said: https://t.co/Kwz4amCOGy

Closing statement for @ICFP2018 by @EllenJMacKenzie dean of @JohnsHopkinsSPH: I've been inspired by all of the great work going on in many different countries. Whenever young people get involved, good things happen. You bring the audacity of hope. #ICFP2018 #ICFPYouth

Our President & CEO @TraciLBaird shares her commitment to advance gender equity at #ICFP2018.

More about our new CEO and her vision for success: https://t.co/R8lKgYp641
#genderequality #familyplanning

Staff had fun brainstorming responses to this challenge - and we are thrilled to be a finalist! https://t.co/0g18FFrItv

Thank you to the government and people of #Rwanda for hosting #ICFP2018. Delightful hosts and role models for a global discussion of #familyplanning. Murakoze! #familyplanning2020

“The most essential ingredient is the determination to do something. And to do it with what you have.” THIS is what an #FPSuperhero looks like! @FP2020Global #ICFP2018

Congratulations Uganda and Burkina Faso for winning the Excellence in Leadership for #FamilyPlanning at the country level awards at #ICFP0218!

Mustafa Kudrati, our Vice President of Transformative Programs at @EngenderHealth, commits to enhance women’s voices & leadership in #familyplanning.

More about his work: https://t.co/Mdqjtk9nHg #ICFP2018

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Men: Telling It Like It Is, Volumes 1-2

EngenderHealth and Men As Partners® is proud to introduce a new educational tool that focuses on “redefining masculinity” in this era of gender-based violence, HIV, and AIDS. In Men: Telling It Like It Is, Volume 1 and Volume 2, EngenderHealth/Men As Partners focus on characters who take the audience through their experiences with HIV and being a man in South Africa. The characters highlight key HIV prevention messages of getting tested for HIV, choosing abstinence, and confronting sexual harassment. The videos challenge traditional and unhealthy male gender norms linked to masculinity.

Volume 1
In the first volume, three characters in the video reflect attitudes and behaviors of men who have been exposed to Men As Partners (MAP) workshops and the impact of the workshops in helping them to make informed decisions regarding specific situations. The first character, a 23-year-old man, describes himself as a former “player.” Upon knowing his HIV status, he chose to abstain from sexual activity. The second character highlights the importance of knowing one’s HIV status early. Though he says it has not been an easy process, he had to be a real man and get tested. By knowing his status, he is ready to continue with the big plans he has for his life. The third character, a 32-year-old construction worker, reflects on how he used to harass women until the matter was brought closer to home. He now challenges men who harass women and encourages other men who see women being harassed to speak out. Using local dialect with English subtitles, the key target audience is young people ages 15-30 from both rural and urban settings, but the video (originally produced for DVD distribution) has been developed for use in various settings.

Volume 2
In the second volume, three characters in the video reflect attitudes and behaviors of men who have been exposed to Men As Partners (MAP) workshops and the impact of the workshops in helping them to make informed decisions regarding specific situations. The first character, a 26-year-old man, talks about how he was a violent boyfriend whose interaction with the MAP program made him realize the problems he had created. The second character, a 63-year-old man, discusses the years of physical and emotional abuse he inflicted on his family, but how his relationships are healing. The third character, a 26-year-old woman, reflects on how she grew up physically and sexually abused as a child, and how the MAP program helped her realize her wrong attitudes towards herself and toward men.

This video project was originally made possible by funding provided by the United States Presidential Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), via the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Southern Africa Mission and the ACQUIRE Project (a global reproductive health initiative managed by EngenderHealth).

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