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#Genderequality in healthcare matters. Women account for 70% of all #healthworkers yet face discrimination, harassment, and lower pay on the job. https://t.co/7TtGieNi8B Via @WHO.

An important report with compelling data and analysis on #genderequity and #WomeninGH . "Lack of gender balance in health leadership means global health loses female talent, perspectives and knowledge." Thank you @womeninGH @WHO https://t.co/Q5SfvW8nKI

Empowering out-of-school adolescent girls and young women with vocational skills training so as to mitigate their vulnerability to GBV. This young lady receives her tailoring machine after finishing her training @EngenderHealth @USEmbassyLLW

@TraciLBaird @EngenderHealth It was an honor and a pleasure to have Traci Baird with us at the U of U, as the inaugural lecturer of the Women’s Leadership in Global Health. A true living example!

I had a great time speaking with faculty and staff working on #globalhealth at the University of Utah yesterday. I appreciated their interest in @EngenderHealth’s commitment to #genderequality in our programs and for our organization. Thank you @globalhealthuu!

Call to action made by speakers at @WomenDeliver #csw19 side event: Make donors develop sustainable funding plans, break the glass ceiling & bring in women to leadership positions, building on the development and humanitarian nexus. #Humanitarian4Her

The 63rd session of the UN Commission on the Status of Women, #CSW63, is now underway!

Opening remarks from our Executive Director @phumzileunwomen : https://t.co/Mgo0Uh5Hic

Thank you for your leadership and partnership, Dr Kanem @Atayeshe, @UNFPA, @WomenDeliver #CSW63 #ICPD25

"I am passionate about a woman’s right to control her own health care—especially as it relates to pregnancy. Thank you to the health professionals who make this possible—especially abortion providers." -@TraciLBaird #CelebrateAbortionProviders #NDAAP

When #shedecides #withoutquestion it is a better world. #period @RutgersNL @SheDecidesGFI

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Mali

Mali is one of the poorest countries of the world, with the majority of its population living in its rural, desert areas. Due to extremely limited availability of health care services, less than half of all Malian women give birth with a skilled health professional. As a result, childbirth can  lead to consequences such as death or sustained injuries including obstetric fistula, a devastating injury caused by prolonged or obstructed labor without timely medical attention.

From 2008 to 2013, EngenderHealth’s activities in Mali focused on addressing obstetric fistula. We partnered with three hospitals to train doctors and nurses to perform fistula repair surgery, as well as medical monitoring and counseling for fistula and family planning. We also collaborated with nursing schools and district health centers to further strengthen emergency obstetric care and better prepare medical professionals to prevent fistula. Over the course of our work in Mali, we trained 18 doctors and 311 nurses in fistula surgery, 184 people in fistula counseling, and supported 460 fistula repair surgeries.

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