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Reversible Methods

Technical Publications and Resources

The Postpartum Intrauterine Device: A Training Course for Service Providers
This curriculum is a clinical course designed to train doctors who will perform postpartum IUD insertions at their home institutions. This course emphasizes the information needed to provide safe and effective postpartum IUD services and provides for extensive practice time. It contains information to help guide the training during a workshop and to assist the trainer in making decisions that will enhance the learning experience. The curriculum has been designed to be used by trainers who are skilled, experienced postpartum IUD providers and who have previously conducted skills training.
(2008) English. Download the Trainer’s Manual (PDF, 6.1MB) SM-A-49 and the Participant's Handbook (PDF, 3.2MB) (not available for ordering). CD-ROM SM-A-49-CD. Free.
Order this publication.

Contraceptive Use and Discontinuation Patterns in Nepal: Norplant, IUCD, Pill, and Injectables
This report summarizes the results of four studies of contraceptive use carried out under the auspices of the Nepal Family Health Program in 2003, and funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). The studies focus on acceptors and providers of four methods—Norplant, IUCD, injectables (Depo-Provera), and oral contraceptives—to examine patterns of acceptance and discontinuation, to document client and provider experience with family planning services, and to explore ways in which access to and use of the four methods in Nepal can be increased.
(2003) Available only in PDF: English (86KB) 

IUD Toolkit
The IUD Toolkit, compiled by members of the IUD Subcommittee of the U.S. Agency for International Development's Maximizing Access and Quality Initiative, provides comprehensive, standardized, scientifically accurate, and evidence-based information on the IUD. This publication provides both guidance on best practices and tools to help improve couples’ access to the IUD and the quality of IUD services.
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Instruments and Supplies Needed to Provide Clinical Methods of Family Planning
This is a checklist of the minimum number and types of medical instruments and supplies that EngenderHealth recommends as needed for provision of each of the four clinical methods of family planning (hormonal implants, IUDs, female sterilization, and vasectomy).
(2008) English. Download as a PDF (20KB).

Hormonal Implants: Service Delivery Considerations for an Improved and Increasingly Popular Method
Hormonal implants are a highly effective, very safe, and reversible form of progestin-only contraception that is quickly and easily provided by a trained provider in a few minutes via a minor surgical procedure. Nearly all women can use this long-acting method, at any stage in their reproductive life. This technical brief from the RESPOND Project provides an overview of the characteristics of this method, as well as programmatic considerations for service delivery, including client eligibility, provider cadres' ability to provide implants, service quality, and access, to name a few.
(2010) Download as a PDF (2.8MB) from the RESPOND Project

Promoting Hormonal Implants within a Range of Long-Acting and Permanent Methods: The Tanzania Experience
One of the challenges to increasing the availability of implants has been ensuring sufficient commodities to meet demand-an issue that many family planning programs face. This brief from the RESPOND Project describes EngenderHealth's approach for supporting the Tanzanian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) in introducing and expanding access to long-acting and permanent methods of contraception (LA/PMs), focusing specifically on challenges and lessons learned related to hormonal implants.
(2010) Download as a PDF (4MB) from the RESPOND Project

Acceptability of Sino-Implant (II) in Bangladesh: Six-Month Findings from a Prospective Study
Bangladeshi women's interest in long-acting family planning methods, and in hormonal implants in particular, appears to have risen in recent years. National service statistics show a dramatic jump in monthly implant insertions to about 44,000, well over the 11,000 per month average of the past five years. This sudden increase suggests that latent demand for the implant is now being met because the device has become more widely available. Currently, one type of implant (Implanon®) is available in Bangladesh, and there is interest in adding Sino-implant (II). To this end, the RESPOND Project and Mayer Hashi were asked by Bangladesh's Directorate General of Family Planning of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to conduct an acceptability trial of Sino-implant (II), to inform the decision on whether to introduce Sino-implant (II) into the national family planning program and to provide lessons for scale-up. As of the midpoint of the one-year study, users of Sino-implant (II) appear to have found it acceptable, with relatively few discontinuing its use and most users reporting their general satisfaction with the method. However, the occurrence of a handful of infection-related side effects and some users' reports of concerns over bleeding-related side effects emphasize the importance of implementing a whole-site training approach at facilities providing the implant.
(2012) Download as a PDF (3MB) from the RESPOND Project

Family Planning for Women and Couples Following Fistula Care
This booklet developed by Fistula Care provides clients with information about family planning methods for couples following a woman's fistula repair.
(2010) English (1MB), French (1.2MB)

Inreach: Reaching Potential Family Planning Clients within Health Institutions
Working Paper #5. Outlines a strategy for improving access to family planning services for clients who visit hospitals and clinics for other services. Describes a pilot project in Kenya.
(1994) Available only in HTML: English, French.

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