[ Skip Navigation ]
 

Recent Projects

In recent years, several lengthy projects have ended or transformed into other projects.

  • The ACQUIRE Project (Access, Quality, and Use in Reproductive Health) was a global cooperative agreement supported by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). ACQUIRE advanced and supported the availability, quality, and use of facility-based reproductive health and family planning services at every level of the health care system and strengthened links between facilities and communities. EngenderHealth is the managing partner of several ACQUIRE follow-up projects, including the RESPOND Project, the Fistula Care Project, the ACQUIRE Tanzania Project, and more.
  • The ACQUIRE Tanzania Project (ATP) expanded access to quality family planning services, with an emphasis on long-acting and permanent methods, as well as increasing access to comprehensive post-abortion care and prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission services. 
  • The APHIA II-Nyanza Project (AIDS, Population, and Health Integrated Assistance) was a five-year project in Kenya that worked to improve and expand sustainable HIV and tuberculosis (TB) prevention, treatment, care, and support services, along with integrated reproductive health, safe motherhood, family planning, malaria and selected child survival services.
  • The AWARE-RH Project (Action for West Africa Region Reproductive Health and Child Survival Project) was a five-year initiative funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) aimed at improving reproductive and maternal and child health services across 21 countries in West Africa.  EngenderHealth continues to participate in the subsequent AWARE-II Project.
  • The AWARE II Project advanced family planning, reproductive health, maternal and neonatal health, and HIV and AIDS prevention, care, and treatment throughout West Africa
  • The CHAMPION Project increased men’s involvement in preventing the spread of HIV in Tanzania, by taking a holistic approach to HIV prevention and addressing the underlying gender issues that drive HIV transmission. 
  • The Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) contributes to shaping collective efforts to improve maternal health worldwide, serving as a catalyst to address one of the most neglected areas in global health. The MHTF at EngenderHealth continued through April 2012 under joint management with the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), where it now resides within the HSPH Women and Health Initiative.
  • The Fistula Care Project was a six-year project funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) aimed at restoring the dignity of women suffering from fistula and addressing the causes of obstetric fistula so that new cases could be prevented. It has been followed by the current Fistula Care Plus Project.
  • The Reducing Maternal Morbidity and Mortality Program (R3M) was an eight-year project (2006-2014) in Ghana that supported the increased use of contraception, especially long-acting and permanent methods. EngenderHealth contributed to the project as part of a consortium led by the Population Council; additional consortium partners included IPAS, Marie Stopes International, Willows Foundation, and the Ministry of Health/Ghana Health Services.
  • The RESPOND Project was a six-year USAID-funded global project that increased access in 11 countries to a range of contraceptives, with particular focus on long-acting and permanent methods. 
  • Quality Health Partners (QHP) was a 5-year project (2004-2009) funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to support the Ghana Health Service/Ministry of Health to ensure high quality of reproductive and child health services in Ghana.

Share This Page: