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Fistula Care Plus

EngenderHealth implements the Fistula Care Plus project, the largest U.S. government-funded effort to date to focus on treatment and prevention of fistula. With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), Fistula Care Plus conducts a full range of efforts to restore the dignity of women suffering from fistula and to address the causes of obstetric fistula so that new cases may be prevented.

Fistula Care Plus collaborates with a host of international and national partners. Key global partners include the Population Council, Dimagi, Direct Relief International, the Fistula Foundation, the Maternal Health Task Force, and Terrewode. 

The objectives of the Fistula Care Plus Project are to achieve:

  • A strengthened enabling environment to institutionalize fistula prevention, treatment, and reintegration in the public and private sectors.
  • Enhanced community understanding and practices to prevent fistula, improve access to fistula treatment, reduce stigma, and support reintegration of women and girls with fistula.
  • Reduced transportation, communications, and financial barriers to accessing preventive care, detection, treatment, and reintegration support.
  • Strengthened provider and health facility capacity to provide and sustain quality services for fistula prevention, detection, and treatment.
  • Strengthened evidence base for approaches to improve fistula care and scaled-up application of standard monitoring & evaluation (M&E) indicators for prevention and treatment.

Fistula Care Plus will build on, enhance, and expand the work undertaken by the previous Fistula Care project (2007-2013). Through Fistula Care, EngenderHealth worked alongside its partners and local and national governments to support more than 26,000 fistula repair surgeries in 14 countries and trained 22,000 surgeons, nurses, and community health workers to prevent and treat fistula. The project also helped support policy changes that tackled root causes of fistula, including lack of access to family planning and poor access to emergency obstetric care.

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